Chicken Coop: Construction-In-Progress

Last weekend we started building the chicken coop.

We have 17 little chickies that are a week old today, and they’re fast outgrowing their little container that they’re currently in. Hopefully in the next few weeks we’ll be able to move them into this new coop.

It all started with dirt.

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Moving sod, digging, leveling the dirt to get the site ready to build on. We all jumped in and got it done.

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Thankfully, it was a nice sunny day. Then we dug a trench around the perimeter of the site (which is  10′ long x 8’wide ) so that we could put chicken wire down in the dirt and bury it to deter any digging predators/pests like rats or raccoons.

And once we were done, we realized that the trench wasn’t over far enough. So we dug it again.

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Next, we dug the post holes for the corners!

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And installed them..

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My Dad has a never-ending supply of wood, being a logger. We’re so thankful for that!

We used cedar posts and fir for the cross beams and the main body of the coop.

We were going to use this log as corner posts, but when my brother Brian opened it up, it was full of termites. Ick. Thankfully we had more cedar for posts!

We were going to use this log as corner posts, but when my brother Brian opened it up, it was full of termites. Ick. Thankfully we had more cedar for posts!

Then it was time for the rafters to go up! This was interesting to watch. I’m glad I didn’t have to help; it was rather precarious! The guys tied a rope around the cross beams and lifted them up, then slid them into the notches that had been cut into the front posts. It took a few tries of sawing bits off and adjusting the beam to get it to fit.

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End of day one: Not too bad! We got a good start on this project.

Day two: We laid the chicken wire on the floor, buried it, then finished putting up the rafters and started on the walls.

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We peeled the logs for the rafters to help them dry out quicker and keep them from rotting.

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Then Dad and Tim finished putting up the rafters and started on the walls.

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Then, we found a door lying around in the back shed and built a frame for it.

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And installed it.

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Finally; as the sun was sinking behind the hill and the temperature was rapidly dropping, a bit of the walls began to go up.

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The guys were so ready to come inside and eat dinner at that point- it was a long, hard day but we got a lot accomplished!

I can’t wait til next weekend when we can work on it some more and hopefully get the rest of the walls done!

 

 

Shared at WildCrafting Wednesday

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7 thoughts on “Chicken Coop: Construction-In-Progress

  1. That’s going to be beautiful! I would like to keep chickens someday (Hopefully as soon as I own my own place). If you don’t mind me asking, how much is this coop going to cost? I would like to be as cost-effective as possible without cutting corners.
    ~The Homesteading Hippy

    • Thanks!
      For us, the main cost will be the metal roofing, since we got the wood for free and already had chicken wire laying around. It will probably be around $200.
      This is our second coop we’ve built and for the first coop, which was quite a bit smaller, the main cost was chicken wire, which was about $100. Again, we were able to get the wood for free; salvaging scrap wood from the side of the road and collecting pallets from behind warehouses.
      Always look secondhand before buying something new though-most of the time you can find what you need on Craigslist or yard sales or freecycle or on the side of the road. 🙂
      Good luck with your future coop, chickens are so much fun!

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